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Friday 4 | h 9:00 pm
Saturday 5 | h 10:00 pm
WeGil - Scalinata
concert - workshop outcome
30'

free entry subject to availability

Gérald Kurdian

Hot Bodies - Choir

Singing is a way for human beings to connect to their deeper selves and to give a listen to their inner voices. Sexual minorities seem to carry throughout time many underlying emotions, unanswered oppressions and traumas the normative world doesn’t offer any space to heal in.
The Hot Bodies – Choir workshop is thought as a place for the expression of these unspoken affects, a place to tell, to voice out and to become the supporting voicing body of others.
The Hot Bodies – Choir workshop gather queer, LGBTIE+ and feminist individuals around writing and choir singing practices.
In their frame, one exchanges experiences and ideas from the reading of queer-feminist manifestos towards the collective writing of revolutionary texts.
These unique, polyphonic and unruly texts, hence constitute the basis of a choral score, arranged musically by Gérald Kurdian and performed live by all the participants.

The HOT BODIES – CHOIR workshops gather queer, LGBTIEA+ and feminist individuals around writing and choir singing practices.
In their frame, one exchanges experiences and ideas from the reading of queer-feminist manifestos (Scum Manifesto – Valérie Solanas, Cyborg Manifesto – Donna Haraway, etc) towards the collective writing of revolutionary texts.
These unique, polyphonic and unruly texts, hence constitute the basis of a choral score, arranged musically by Gérald Kurdian and performed live by all the participants.
HOT BODIES – CHOIRS is the third project of Gérald Kurdian’s research cycle HOT BODIES OF THE FUTURE around sexual revolutions.

Workshop infos here

Gérald Kurdian studied visual arts at the ENSA Paris-Cergy before entering the performance and contemporary dance program Ex.e.r.ce 07 under the direction of Mathilde Monnier and Xavier Le Roy.
His oblique concerts inspired by the genres of stand-up comedy, live musical or pop acts are opportunities to invent synergies between electronic music, performance art and documentary practices.
In 2016, he released, Icosaèdre, a french-speaking EP produced by the brilliant electronic musician Chapelier Fou.
Since then, he develops HOT BODIES OF THE FUTURE!, a performative and musical research cycle on alternative forms of sexualities and queer micro-politics within which he initiates experimental queer healing choir projects (HOT BODIES – CHOIR), intersectional parties (A QUEER BALL FOR HOT BODIES OF THE FUTURE) and live music acts (TAREK X / HOT BODIES – STAND UP).
wearehotbodiesofthefuture.org

concept and transmission Gérald Kurdian
production Tiphaine Gagne / Hot Bodies of the Future
in collaboration with la Francia in Scena, artistic season of Institut français Italia / Ambasciata di Francia in Italia and supported by Fondazione Nuovi Mecenati

Notes on Short Theatre 2020

 

What else is your work about, besides what is already told in the synopsis?
Audio transcription:

Hot Bodies Choirs is one of the projects of the Hot Bodies of the Future cycle. It is an artistic research transdisciplinary, artistic research cycle where I observe how minorities or these community bodies use music and musical context to push their revolutions further. So it is of course very much about stressing or reminding the contribution of the minorities in the political construct of the world. It’s also very much about sharing voices or what are the tools that music offers to get people to support each other through the voicing of each other’s ideas or affects or states, points of view, emotions. It’s also very much about understanding the purpose of music. So is music really disconnected from politics? I don’t think so. So how do we give to music the possibility to become a political tool?

Who or what—real or imaginary, present, past or future—do you think contributed to the creation of this work? Is there any object/trace you own that can make this clear?

I will do the second question again because I’ve changed my mind. I will share with you the text called I want a dyke for president, I mean it is actually called I want a president, by Zoe Leonard. It is from 1992 and it is also kind of a manifesto, but it has this voids, it is not perfect, it has something that people are happy to discuss about but it also has this ironic and poetic strength and it is kind intimate because it is someone who really takes a position which I think it is something that we think a lot in the Choirs. So this is the proposal I want a president by Zoe Leonard, 1992.

What do you imagine you will say about this work in fifteen years time? Would you ever have imagined making such work fifteen years ago?

Audio transcription:

Well in 15 years I hope it would appear like a little really small thing compared to all the things that we would have managed to do in the past of this 15 future years. I mean I really hope that it is the beginning of something, so in 15 years I hope to say to my self it was a nice way to start.
I absolutely would not have ever imagined making such work fifteen years ago! I was a really closeted artist and I was very shy about finding connections between my artistic practice and my militant activist concern and involvement.